Clerking For Governing Bodies

In this article, we look briefly at the role of the clerk, and what resources are available to schools to make sure that their clerk is supported.

Clerking for governing bodies

It has recently been suggested that the governing bodies of a number of schools and academies may not be meeting their obligations in relation to clerking. In this article, we look briefly at the role of the clerk, and what resources are available to schools to make sure that their clerk is supported.

Boards can run the risk of relegating their clerk to an organisational or administrative role. Whilst these are important elements of a clerk's job description, the clerk should have the specialist knowledge to be able to guide the board as to its statutory, legal and ethical obligations and responsibilities.

The Governance Handbook suggests that boards should employ a "professional clerk". In the Clerking Competency Framework, this is to be taken to mean high-quality, tailored delivery of advice on regulatory and procedural governance matters. Rather more than a volunteer or the coerced minute taker. The risk of using a volunteer is that they may well lack the independence, knowledge and ability to speak up required of a clerk.

All maintained schools and academies are required to have a clerk to their governing body (in school regulations or the academy's articles of association). However this falls short of a requirement to have a professional clerk. It is the Clerk's role to provide efficient and effective:

administrative and organisational support; guidance to ensure that the governing body/board works in compliance with the appropriate legal and regulatory framework, and understands the potential consequences for non-compliance; and advice on procedural matters relating to the operation of the governing body/board. A key objective of a clerk is to provide an additional resource to help the governing body remain on mission, avoiding sinking into operational matters which can so easily divert energy and attention. The voluntary...

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